Commentaries

Community network for deaf scientists Science 28 Apr 2017: Vol. 356, Issue 6336, pp. 386-387

 

Early Education of the Deaf

Early Education of the Deaf

As deaf and hard-of-hearing research scientists, we were pleased to read about the quickening pace of genetic research into causes of deafness in Elizabeth Pennisi’s article “The architecture of hearing” (Research News, 14 Nov., [p. 1223][1]). We would not agree, however, that the value of early diagnosis based on genetic screening lies in allowing affected infants to be taught sign language from a very early age.

Source: science.sciencemag.org/content/279/5357/1611l

 

Evan Mercer – Johns Hopkins 2016 Undergraduate Research Symposium

 

Hearing Health Foundation PSA featuring Dominic Pisano

“Dominic Pisano shares his experience with hearing loss in the Hearing Health Foundation 2012 PSA”

 

Undergraduate research in mathematics with deaf and hard-of-hearing students: four perspectives

Involving more deaf and hard-of-hearing students in undergraduate research is a step toward getting more such students into STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) careers. Since evidence exists that undergraduate research improves retention, especially for some underrepresented groups that have low retention rates— as, for example, deaf and hard-of-hearing STEM majors— it is a particularly pertinent step to keep interested students in these career paths. Nunes and Moreno have suggested that deaf and hard-of-hearing students have the potential to pursue mathematics, but lack the resources. By involving more such individuals in undergraduate mathematics research, we can improve their success rates and promote mathematics research within the Deaf community.

Source: https://msp.org/involve/2014/7-3/involve-v7-n3-p02-s.pdf

 

The “invisible” faculty member: The university professor with a hearing disability

This article reviews the characteristics of age-related hearing loss and discusses the consequences of hearing loss for senior professors at our universities and colleges. It presents some of the strategies, for use by the hearing-impaired and the non-hearing-impaired, to adapt successfully to age-related hearing impairments. Examples are cited for the classroom and for the general university environment. By commenting on her personal experiences as a senior faculty member, the author hopes to illuminate some important issues raised when a professor has impaired hearing.

Source: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1023/B:HIGH.0000016421.25286.e8

 

Equitable representation of deaf people in mainstream academia: Why not?

Approximately 5% of people in most countries have deafness or significant hearing loss. This significant minority is underrepresented in mainstream universities across the world. Background information about deafness, relevant technology and its drawbacks, and the use of interpreters are discussed. The barriers to equitable representation of qualified Deaf academics in university settings are reviewed. The experiences of three Deaf academics who teach in mainstream universities are discussed, and suggestions for resolution are offered. Examples are cited for teaching, research and service, the threefold duties of the successful academic. Continuing access difficulties mean that only a few deaf graduates now consider doctoral study; cost and the perception of cost, as well as negative attitudes and lack of knowledge may mean that the few successful graduates have difficulties gaining employment; successful tenure and promotion prospects may also be hindered for the same reasons. We also provide recommendations how barriers for successful Deaf academics can be removed or mitigated.

Source: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10734-005-2428-x

 

Deaf and hard of hearing faculty in higher education: enhancing access, equity, policy, and practice

Higher education institutions are often well prepared in terms of accommodation policies and practices for disabled students. Ironically, campuses are often not prepared once disabled academics return as faculty. Most are particularly unfamiliar with the unique access needs of deaf or hard of hearing academics. This can result in career hindrances to employment and tenure, as well as potential losses to campuses in terms of diversity. Background and substantiation on this access issue is provided along with recommendations for policy-making and practices for campuses that are geared to ensuring career success for deaf and hard of hearing faculty.

Source: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09687599.2015.1113160

 

Accessible Mathematics for People with Hearing Loss at Colleges and Universities

“Mathematics is the one subject in school that does not require hearing,” wrote the late Dame Kathleen Ollerenshaw (Figure 1) [3]. She was the second person with hearing loss to obtain a doctoral degree in mathematics, at the University of Oxford in 1945. Among other things, she studied magic squares, including finding the first general solution for restoring the Rubik’s® Cube. Ollerenshaw’s striking statement portrays mathematics as a visual discipline that is naturally attractive to people with hearing loss. Yet few others with hearing loss have obtained doctoral degrees in mathematics. There were 13 in the United States from 2006 to 2010 [5], and at least 6 from the University of Oxford based on anecdotal information.”

Source: https://www.ams.org/publications/journals/notices/201710/rnoti-p1180.pdf

 

In Their Own Words: Tilak Ratnanather | PAESMEM

In Their Own Words: Tilak Ratnanather | paesmem

Dr. Tilak Ratnanather, associate research professor of biomedical engineering, Johns Hopkins University, (PAESMEM 2012), provides advice for students with hearing loss on the challenge of being ignored in the classroom.

Source: www.paesmem.net/node/2721

 

What if you were born deaf? What if your child was? J. Tilak Ratnanather on Mentoring

What if you were born deaf? What if your child was? J. Tilak Ratnanather on Mentoring

J. Tilak Ratnanather, D.Phil. is an associate research professor at Johns Hopkins University specializing in brain imaging. In 2015, Dr. Ratnanather was invi…

Source: www.youtube.com/watch?v=IqzL_upOTJE